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Admission to the University

Application Procedures

Freshman Admission Requirements

Transfer Admission Requirements

Re-admission Requirements

Applying to the Admissions Committee

Dual Credit

Non-degree Admission Requirements

International Admission Requirements

Evaluation of Transfer Credits

General Education Requirements for Transfer Students

Graduate Admission to the University

Academic Requirements

Priority Deadlines and Application Fees

Graduate Record Examination

Transcripts and Application for Graduate Admission

Acceptance to the College of Graduate Studies

Graduate Admission Categories

Graduate Admission of International Students

Information about the undergraduate admission process and application forms are available from the Office of Admissions or online at www.uidaho.edu/admissions. Applicants for admission to the university must present satisfactory evidence of good character.

Students who are pursuing a baccalaureate degree are classified as undergraduates: freshmen (fewer than 26 semester credits), sophomores (fewer than 58 semester credits), juniors (fewer than 90 semester credits), or seniors.

Application Procedures

All applicants for admission are required to submit:

  1. The appropriate, completed application form (i.e., undergraduate, non-degree, or international). Failure to list all institutions attended or submission of inaccurate transcripts or other supporting documents as specified on the application form is considered fraud and subjects the applicant to immediate cancellation of his or her registration and/or dismissal from the university.
  2. Official transcripts from the last high school and all colleges or universities attended. (See sections on freshman, transfer, non-degree, or international admission requirements for further details.) Transcripts submitted in support of an application must be official and must be sent directly to the Office of Admissions by the issuing institution. Transcripts received become the property of the university and cannot be returned, copied, or forwarded. Official transcripts must be signed by the registrar, superintendent, principal, or other authorized official of the school.
  3. Applicants who are still in high school should apply during their senior year and should ask their high school counselor to send a copy of their current transcript and ACT or SAT scores to the Office of Admissions. If qualified, the applicant will be given an early notice of acceptance based on this record. Final acceptance will be granted when the university receives a final transcript mailed directly from the high school verifying that the applicant has graduated from a regionally accredited high school and has satisfied all admission requirements.
  4. Scores from the College Board (SAT) or the American College Testing Program (ACT) if applying for admission to the freshman class. This includes transfer applicants with fewer than 14 transferable semester credits. International applicants are not required to submit ACT or SAT scores.
  5. A non-refundable application fee of $50 for domestic students and $70 for international applicants. Review of the application will be delayed until this fee is received. This fee is not charged to students applying for non-degree status or to applicants seeking re-admission.

Application Deadlines. To provide time for evaluation and for notice of acceptance to reach the applicant, applications and credentials should be submitted to the Office of Admissions at least three weeks prior to the beginning of classes. International applicants have different deadlines (see "International Admission Requirements").

Notification of Admission. When all of an applicant's credentials have been received and he or she has been found eligible, a letter of acceptance and information on registration procedures will be sent. Acceptance is granted for a specified semester or summer session. If an applicant does not register for the term for which he or she applied and was accepted, it will be necessary to file a new application if entrance at a later time is desired.

Freshman Admission Requirements

Freshman applicants graduating from high school prior to 1995 must meet the requirements in effect for their graduation year. A degree-seeking applicant applying directly from high school or with fewer than 14 semester credits of transferable college work earned after high school graduation must:

  1. Submit ACT or SAT scores.
  2. Graduate from a regionally accredited high school with a combination of cumulative GPA* and test scores** as defined in the following table:

High School GPA

 

ACT Composite

 

SAT Verbal + Math

3.00 – 4.00

And

Any test score

Or

Any test score

2.60 – 2.99

And

15 – 36

Or

790 – 1600

2.50 – 2.59

And

17 – 36

Or

870 – 1600

2.40 – 2.49

And

19 – 36

Or

930 – 1600

2.30 – 2.39

And

21 – 36

Or

1000 – 1600

2.20 – 2.29

And

23 – 36

Or

1070 – 1600

* Unweighted

** Written sections of the test not required for admission.

  1. Complete specified high school courses with a minimum 2.00 GPA as listed below. A credit is defined as a course taken with a minimum of 70 hours of classroom instruction. A high school credit can be counted in only one category.
    1. English: A minimum of 8 credits (4 years), selected from composition and literature courses or courses that integrate composition, language, and literature.
    2. Mathematics: A minimum of 6 credits (3 years) including algebra I or applied math I, geometry or applied math II, and algebra II. An additional 2 credits are strongly recommended. Other courses may include probability, discrete math, analytic geometry, calculus, statistics, and trigonometry. Four of the required mathematics credits must be taken in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades.
    3. Social Science: A minimum of 5 credits (2 years), selected from American government (state and local), geography, U.S. history, world history, psychology, sociology, and economics (consumer economics courses approved by the Idaho State Board of Education may be counted toward this requirement).
    4. Natural Science: A minimum of 6 credits (3 years), selected from anatomy, biology, chemistry, geology, earth science, physical science, physiology, physics, zoology, and applied science courses jointly approved by the State Department of Education (SDOE) and the State Department of Professional-Technical Education (DSPTE) (maximum of two credits in this category). Ecology will count if SDOE approved. At least two credits must involve laboratory science experience. Note: A laboratory science course is defined as one in which at least one class period each week is devoted to providing students the opportunity to manipulate equipment, materials, or specimens; develop skills in observation and analysis; and discover, demonstrate, illustrate, or test scientific principles or concepts.
    5. Humanities/Foreign Language: A minimum of 2 credits (1 year), selected from literature, history, philosophy, foreign language, fine arts, and interdisciplinary humanities (related study of two or more of the traditional humanities disciplines). These courses should emphasize history, appreciation, theory, analysis, and/or critique. History courses beyond those required for state high school graduation may be counted. Foreign language study is strongly recommended. Native American language (five Idaho tribes) may meet this requirement if taught by certified high school faculty.
    6. Other College Preparation: A minimum of 3 credits (1 years), of which no more than one credit may be in speech or debate (debate must be taught by a certified teacher). Other courses may include studio/performing arts (art, dance, drama, and music) or foreign language (beyond any foreign language credit applied in the humanities/foreign language category). May include no more than two credits in SDPTE-approved classes in agricultural science and technology, business and office education, health occupations education, family and consumer sciences education, occupational family and consumer science education, trade, industrial, and technical education, and individualized occupational training.
  2. Applicants with fewer than 14 semester hours of transfer credit completed after high school graduation must meet both freshman and transfer admission requirements, including submission of the required test scores. (See "Freshmen Admission Requirements" above.)
  3. Students who have participated in running start, dual credit or accelerated learning programs who concurrently enroll in college credit courses while still in high school need to meet freshman requirements for admission and submit all of the appropriate high school documentation regardless of the number of transferable credits completed. See Freshman Admission Requirements.

If a freshman applicant does not qualify for regular admission or satisfies one of the criteria below, he or she may apply to the Admissions Committee for consideration (see Applying to the Admissions Committee).

  1. Graduates from a non-accredited high school,
  2. Is home schooled,
  3. Obtains a General Educational Development (GED) certificate,
  4. Deserves consideration because of special circumstances (i.e. disadvantaged or minority status, delayed entry, returning veteran, a talented student wishing to enter college early, and/or similar situations).

Transfer Admission Requirements

Applicants who have been enrolled in other colleges or universities accredited by one of the regional accrediting agencies, such as the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, and who have satisfactorily accumulated 14 or more transferable credits after high school graduation may be admitted with advance standing as transfer students.

In addition to a completed undergraduate admission application form, transfer applicants must submit the following credentials to the Undergraduate Admissions Office:

  1. Official transcripts from each college or university previously attended. To be considered official transcripts must be mailed directly to the University of Idaho Undergraduate Admissions Office by the issuing institution. Transcripts received become the property of the university and cannot be returned, copied or forwarded.
  2. Students participating in running start, dual credit or accelerated learning programs who are concurrently enrolled in college credit courses while still attending high school need to meet freshman requirements for admission and submit all the appropriate high school documentation regardless of the number of transferable credits completed. See Freshman Admission Requirements.
  3. Applicants with fewer than 14 semester hours of transfer credit since high school graduation must meet both freshman and transfer admission requirements, including submission of the required test scores. (See "Freshman Admission Requirements," above.)

Transfer students are selected from those applicants who present a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00 (C) for all college-level study attempted in all accredited colleges attended, exclusive of courses for which credits are not allowed. Students transferring from out-of-state schools into the College of Engineering must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.80. Admission of transfer students to the landscape architecture program will be based on GPA (typically limited to 2.5 or above), test scores (ACT/SAT), and a portfolio with a letter of intent submitted to the department.

Students admitted to the University of Idaho from other collegiate educational institutions must have complied with the academic regulations for continuance in the institution(s) that they have attended in addition to the academic regulations that are applied to students enrolled in this institution.

An applicant with previous college work who does not qualify for regular admission may also seek provisional acceptance by applying to the Admissions Committee for consideration (see Applying to the Admissions Committee).

Re-admission Requirements

Students returning after two years from last attendance must complete an Application for Readmission and submit official transcripts from all colleges or universities attended since last enrolling at UI. (Also see regulation B-1) Application forms are available on-line at www.uidaho.edu/admissions.

Returning students who were in good academic standing when they left the UI are guaranteed readmission. Returning students who were not in good academic standing when they left the university need to submit the above materials and follow the appropriate reinstatement procedures as stated in regulation L-4. Contact the Admissions Office for more information (208/885-6326, admissions@uidaho.edu).

Applying to the Admissions Committee

Applicants who do not qualify for admission to the University of Idaho may petition the Admissions Committee. Such applicants must submit to the Undergraduate Admissions Office an application for admission, the appropriate fee, all required official transcripts and test scores, three signed letters of recommendation, and a signed written statement of the student's objectives. This information should be received in the Undergraduate Admissions Office by August 1 for fall semester and December 1 for spring semester.

Students admitted through the Admissions Committee may be granted regular or provisional admission and will be subject to the regulations on academic probation, disqualification, and reinstatement (see regulation L). The Admissions Committee may assign provisionally admitted students a primary adviser. These students, while on provisional status, will need this adviser's approval before registering and when making any changes to their registration. They may be required to attend pre-academic planning within an office or a program of the University.

Freshmen admitted provisionally may change to regular admission status upon satisfactory completion of 14 credits, 12 of which must be in four different categories of the general education requirements (see regulation J-3). Regular admission status must be attained within three semesters or the student will be dismissed, subject to the Admissions Committee's appeal procedures.

Transfer students admitted provisionally must enroll on probation, meet all conditions imposed by the committee, and complete the first semester with at least a 2.00 grade-point average or they will be dismissed, subject to the Admissions Committee's appeal procedure.

Dual Credit

Dual credit is a program authorized by the Idaho State Legislature that provides qualified high school students with an opportunity to receive both high school and university credit for classes taken at the University of Idaho. High school students are eligible if they are at least 16 years old before the first day of class in any semester OR they have completed at least half the high school graduation requirements (generally high school juniors and seniors).

To apply for the dual credit program, students must complete the UI "Application and Registration for High School Dual Credit" form, available from the Office of Dual Credit (208/885-6237) or online at www.uidaho.edu/dualcredit. The completed application must be signed by the student's parent/guardian and high school principal or counselor. Students under age 16 must also obtain permission from the course instructor. Written notice of acceptance to the dual credit program and confirmation of registration will be provided to the student. Dual credit students are not eligible for federal or state financial aid programs.

Non-degree Admission Requirements

This category is for applicants who wish to enroll in courses pertaining to their personal interest and who do not want to work toward a formal degree at the University of Idaho. Application forms are available on-line at www.uidaho.edu/admissions.

A person admitted as a non-degree student who wants to take undergraduate courses must (1) be a high school graduate or have completed the GED; (2) understand that acceptance in this category does not constitute acceptance to a degree-granting program; (3) have sufficient educational background to qualify for the course or courses in which enrollment is sought; (4) accept personal responsibility for the applicability of credits earned while registered in this category; and (5) understand that students in this non-degree category cannot be considered for federal or state financial aid.

A student who has not yet graduated from high school or obtained a GED may be admitted as a non-degree student based on the dual credit policies of the University of Idaho (see Dual Credit).

A person admitted as a non-degree student who wants to take graduate-level courses must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution with a GPA of 3.00 or higher. Strict limitations exist for use of non-degree credits toward a graduate degree. Please refer to the College of Graduate Studies section.

Applicants whose native language is not English must provide proof of English proficiency.

A non-degree student may register for no more than 7 credits each semester and may complete a maximum of 32 semester credits. Students on official UI exchange programs and those in the dual credit program are not limited to 7 credits each semester. International exchange students must take 12 or more credits. Upon completion of 32 semester credits, the student must either be admitted as a degree-seeking student at the University of Idaho or submit a letter of appeal to continue as a non-degree student. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in courses numbered 500-600. Permission of the dean of the College of Law is required to enroll in courses numbered 800-999.

A non-degree student seeking admission as an undergraduate student or as a graduate student will remain classified as a non-degree student and will not be admitted to a program until all admission requirements have been met. Total credits and the UI GPA will be considered when applying for admission. Credit earned as a non-degree student will be moved to the undergraduate transcript upon admission as an undergraduate student unless the student specifically requests in writing to the Registrar's Office that all credits earned remain on the non-degree transcript.

Any deviations to the admission policy or credit limits will be acted on by the Director of Admissions and/or the Admissions Committee if the student wishes to enroll for undergraduate credit. Any deviations to the admission policy or credit limits will be acted on by the associate dean of the College of Graduate Studies and director of graduate admissions and/or the Graduate Petitions Committee if the student wishes to enroll for graduate credit.

International Admission Requirements

The University of Idaho encourages the application of qualified students from other nations to join its student community. Admission is dependent upon credentials which demonstrate a capacity to succeed academically at the university level. Application forms are available on-line at www.uidaho.edu/admissions.

In some instances, individual departmental requirements may be more rigorous than the general UI admission requirements. In those situations, final admission is based on the department's decision.

All international students who hold nonresident alien visas and who are pursuing a degree (i.e., matriculated) must hold a valid visa status which allows them to study full-time. Some of these visa categories include but are not limited to F-1, J-1, or H-4. The immigration status of international students must comply with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulations. Individuals holding a U.S. tourist visa (VWP, B1, B2) cannot engage in a course of study in the U.S.

Deadlines for international applicants are as follows:

May 1:

If applying for fall semester

October 1:

If applying for spring semester

March 1:

If applying for summer term

Application Fee:

$70.00 (non-refundable)

International student applicants must submit:

  1. Official transcripts or certified copies of certificate(s), diploma(s), or government examination report(s) received from any educational institution (high school, college, or university). These documents must be translated into English and must be sent by the certifying agency directly to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. Please note: If you are applying after the above deadlines, a professional credential evaluation of your academic transcript(s) is required. Please contact the Admissions Office or visit our website at www.uidaho.edu/admissions for a list of approved credential evaluation agencies.
  2. Proof of English language proficiency. UI requires all applicants whose primary language is not English to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Because most applicants report the test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score, UI bases its minimum English language proficiency requirements on the TOEFL. UI requires a minimum TOEFL score of 525 (paper test), or 70 (internet test). Equivalent measures of proficiency acceptable to UI include: SAT critical reading with a minimum score of 500; Cambridge International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.0; Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) with a pass; Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a pass; Cambridge International "O" Levels with a pass; Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) with a minimum score of 74. Exceptions to the minimum TOEFL requirement are made for (a) those from official English-speaking countries (b) those who have earned a degree from either a U.S. institution or an institution in another official English-speaking country (c) those who successfully complete the American Language and Culture Program at the University of Idaho or (d) based on the judgment of the Undergraduate Admissions Office, those who have successfully completed English courses at U.S. institutions. If required, the TOEFL score or an approved equivalent must be on file before the application for admission will be processed. UI does not accept scores that are more than two years old. Applicants wishing to take the Computer Based TOEFL or the MELAB on campus should contact the Counseling and Testing Center.
  3. A completed "Certificate of Financial Responsibility" and all required supporting documentation as required by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). International students must present to the Undergraduate Admissions Office satisfactory statements of finances and adequate proof of financial responsibility or sponsorship for all financial obligations while attending the university.
  4. If the student is transferring to the University of Idaho from another U.S. college or university, the student must request that their SEVIS record be transferred to the University of Idaho before an I-20 or DS-2019 can be issued.

Undergraduate applicants who have had no previous work at the post-secondary level must have at least a 2.50 grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) from secondary school and must also meet the criteria for being admitted to a university level institution in the applicant's home country in order to be considered for admission to the University of Idaho.

Undergraduate applicants who have attended a post-secondary-level institution must have completed at least 14 transferable semester credits at an accredited/recognized institution and must present a minimum grade-point average of 2.00 for all post-secondary work attempted. For admission into the College of Engineering, transfer students must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.80. Other departments have additional requirements.

Students who have completed fewer than 14 transferable semester credits (post-secondary) must meet the secondary school GPA requirements in addition to the post-secondary transfer requirements.

Applicants who do not meet the minimum university admission requirements may apply to the Admissions Committee. Those applicants must submit an application for admission, the appropriate fee, all required official transcripts and official translations, test scores, three signed letters of recommendation, and a signed written statement of their educational objectives. All materials supporting the applicant's appeal must be submitted in English. This information should be received in the Undergraduate Admissions Office by May 1 in order to be considered for the fall semester and October 1 for the spring semester.

International Application Deadlines. To provide time for evaluation, for notice of admission status to reach the applicant, and for DHS requirements to be met for issuance of a student visa, applications and credentials should be received by the Undergraduate Admissions Office no later than the following dates: May 1 for the fall semester, October 1 for the spring semester, and March 1 for the summer session. Please note: If you are applying after the above deadlines, a professional credential evaluation of your academic transcript(s) is required. Please contact the admissions office or visit our website at www.uidaho.edu/admissions for a list of approved credential evaluation agencies.

International Deferred Admission. Deferred admission may be granted to applicants who qualify academically, but have not yet achieved UI's minimum English language proficiency requirement. Students granted deferred admission must enroll in UI's American Language and Culture Program (ALCP) to achieve the University's English language requirement. If the required level of language proficiency is not achieved within a two-year time period, applicants may petition to continue in the ALCP, and will need to submit a new application for admission to the academic department. Those who are granted deferred admission may qualify for concurrent enrollment.

International Student Concurrent Enrollment. Students admitted under deferred status and students enrolled in ALCP Level 5 or Level 6 may, in consultation with the coordinator of ALCP (to determine appropriate courses) and the course instructor, obtain approval to enroll as non-degree students for up to seven credits per semester of academic courses in addition to their ALCP courses. Students whose proficiency levels later prove inadequate for success in the academic courses may be withdrawn at the discretion of the academic course instructor and the ALCP coordinator. Once students achieve the necessary language qualification and pursue full admission to the university, they may apply credits of academic courses completed while in deferred status toward UI degree programs (other university restrictions may apply).

International Student Health and Accident Insurance. Supplemental health and accident insurance is mandatory for international students who hold nonresident alien visas and all accompanying dependents. Students must purchase and maintain the UI Student Health Insurance policy (SHIP) or document coverage of an equivalent policy with the International Programs Office before classes begin. Failure to obtain and maintain the required insurance may subject students to sanctions, up to and including disenrollment. See information on insurance in the Student Services section.

Status. In order to pursue a degree, international students must be authorized in their current visa status. Immigration regulations require that international students holding F-1 (non-sponsored student) or J-1 (exchange visitor, student classification) visas be certified as full-time students during the academic year. Graduate students are thus required to take a minimum of nine credit hours. For all other visa holders, contact the International Programs Office for rules governing taking courses while in the U.S.

International Student Advisors. The international student advisors (ISAs) are involved with an international student's progress at every stage of the educational process. Once a student has been admitted, the ISA's provide general information about cultural adjustment and the educational system, as well as specific details regarding immigration regulations. Interested students may be paired with local host families for cultural activities through the university's International Friendship Association. All matters pertaining to a student's non-immigrant status are handled through the International Programs Office. A mandatory orientation before registration provides new students with assistance on initial questions. After this orientation, students are invited to visit the ISA's at any time with questions or concerns relating to immigration matters, education, finances, and cultural adjustment. The ISA's also serve as official liaisons between students and their consular offices or sponsoring agencies and the Department of Homeland Security.

International Student Fees. The University of Idaho's International Programs Office strives to provide new international students with the greatest assistance possible as they settle into their new homes in Moscow. As such, attendance at the multi-day international student orientation is required for all new students. This orientation will include a complete immigration workshop as well as offer several meals and other activities. There is a one-time cost of $65 for all new international students which will be added to their student account after they have attended this event Any student who does not attend this orientation will be charged an additional $100 and be required to attend a late orientation session, for a total cost of $165.  There will be a $50 per semester program cost to support international student programming at the university. Please note: These costs do not apply to students on UI exchange programs.

Evaluation of Transfer Credits

Upon admission to the University of Idaho and receipt of all official transcripts, college level courses completed at regionally accredited institutions are evaluated by the Registrar's Office. All credits accepted must be from regionally accredited American institutions or from non-US institutions recognized by the appropriate authorities in their respective countries. The UI degree audit web report details the applicability of the transfer courses to the core curriculum and to the student's program of study. The student's major department may further evaluate the applicability of the transfer courses to the student's selected program of study. Transfer credits are not included in the computation of a student's grade point average at the University of Idaho. Students with courses from educational sources that do not have regional accreditation may request to have the courses reviewed by the UI University Curriculum Committee for possible transfer to UI. Transfer credit from non-U.S. institutions is recorded with grades of pass or fail only. Accepted transfer credits are recorded on the student's permanent record after he or she is officially admitted. The UI database of courses transferable from accredited colleges and universities is on the web at www.uidaho.edu/transferguides/transferframes.html.

Credit for Military Service. Credit may be given for military courses according to recommendations in the American Council on Education (ACE) Service Guide. Credit is not awarded for the military occupation specialties or basic training courses. Credits awarded for military service are recorded with grade of pass or fail only and will appear on UI transcripts after the student is officially admitted. Official documentation is necessary and may include official DD214 papers, official certificates showing completion of courses, and/or an official DD295 Form. Official documents should be sent to the Office of the Registrar, PO Box 444260, Moscow, ID 83844-4260. (See regulation J-5-b for credit limitations.)

Vocational-Technical Credit. Credits earned in vocational-technical courses at accredited or state-approved vocational-technical schools may be the basis for waiving requirements or transferring credits to the University of Idaho in accordance with the following regulations:

  1. When equivalence has been validated by the academic department and college that offer comparable subject matter, credits may be transferred for specific lower-division courses taken at the other institution.
  2. In those cases in which comparable subject matter is not taught at the University of Idaho, the amount and characterization of the credits to be transferred is determined by the department and the dean of the college into which the student is transferring (for example, a block of credits in agriculture).
  3. A grade of P (pass) is recorded for vocational-technical credits that are transferred.
  4. Credits transferred from vocational-technical schools are included in the 48-credit limitation of extramural and similar credits that may be counted toward a baccalaureate degree (see regulation J-5-b).
  5. The department into which the student transfers decides what curricular requirements, if any, will be waived (this determination may be made independently of the transfer of credits).
  6. If there are any questions concerning the waiving of distributional requirements in the college into which the student transfers, such questions are to be resolved by the dean of that college.
  7. For students seeking a liberal arts degree (i.e. B.A. or B.S.) in the College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences, except as substitutions for equivalent courses offered by the student's academic department, no credits in vocational-technical courses taken at a vocational-technical school may be counted toward the 128 credit minimum required for a baccalaureate degree.

Transfer Credit Limitations. A maximum of 70 credits earned at junior or community colleges (or one-half of the total credits required for the student's intended baccalaureate degree program, whichever is the higher number) may be used toward the total net credit requirement of the intended baccalaureate degree program.

Credit Based on Test Scores. Credit is granted for specific scores on the following tests: ACT, SAT, COMPASS, AP (College Board Advanced Placement) and CLEP (College Level Examination Program). (See regulation I.)

General Education Requirements for Transfer Students

One of the requirements for a UI baccalaureate degree is fulfillment of the general-education or "core-curriculum" requirements.

Students who transfer from an academic regionally accredited institution with an earned A.A. or A.S. degree have met the UI general-education requirements.

Students who transfer from any academic regionally accredited institution who have completed the equivalent of Idaho's State Board of Education general-education core (but have not completed an A.A. or A.S. degree) are not required to complete additional lower-division general-education core courses. However, these students must obtain certification of such completion from the transferring institution.

Students who enter UI without having completed an A.A. or A.S. or are not certified as having completed the equivalent of Idaho's State Board of Education general-education core have two options for fulfilling the general-education requirement. One option is to satisfy the requirement as outlined in regulation J-3 in this catalog. In this case, transfer credits are evaluated on a course-by-course basis for equivalency to courses specified in J-3, and deficiencies are made up by completing the necessary additional credits in non-duplicating courses listed in J-3.

The second option is to satisfy the general-education requirements established by the State Board of Education as set forth immediately below. In this case, transfer credits are evaluated by subject matter, rather than on a course-by-course basis, and deficiencies are made up by completing the necessary additional credits in non-duplicating courses listed in J-3. Courses that are approved to satisfy a core requirement can be used to satisfy those requirements even if the course is completed prior to being approved as a core course.

Alternative General Education Requirements for Transfer Students. A minimum of 36 credits is required from the following categories.

  1. Communications: 1 course (2 credits). Coursework in this area enhances students' ability to communicate clearly, correctly, logically, and persuasively in spoken English. Disciplines: Speech, Rhetoric, and Debate
  2. English Composition: 1 course (3-6 credits, depending on initial placement results). In meeting this goal, students must be able to express themselves in clear, logical, and grammatically correct written English. Up to six (6) credits may be exempt by ACT, SAT, CLEP or other institution accepted testing procedure.
  3. Behavioral and Social Science: 2 courses (6 credits). Coursework in this area provides instruction in: (1) the history and culture of civilization; (2) the ways political and/or economic organizations, structures and institutions function and influence thought and behavior; and (3) the scientific method as it applies to social science research. Disciplines: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology. Note: Courses must be distributed over two (2) different disciplines.
  4. Humanities, Fine Arts, and Foreign Language: 2 courses (6 credits). Coursework in this area provides instruction in: (1) the creative process; (2) history and aesthetic principles of the fine arts; (3) philosophy and the arts as media for exploring the human condition and examining values; and (4) communication skills in a foreign language. Disciplines: Art, Philosophy, Literature, Music, Drama/Theater, and Foreign Languages.
  5. Natural Science: 2 courses (7 credits). Coursework in this area: (1) provides an understanding of how the biological and physical sciences explain the natural world and (2) introduces the basic concepts and terminology of the natural sciences. Disciplines: Biology, Chemistry, Physical Geography, Geology, and Physics. Note: Courses may be distributed over two (2) different disciplines and must have at least one (1) accompanying laboratory experience.
  6. Mathematics: 1 course (3 credits). Coursework in this area is intended to develop logical reasoning processes; skills in the use of space, numbers, symbols, and formulas; and the ability to apply mathematical skills to solve problems. Disciplines: College Algebra, Calculus, Finite Mathematics, and Statistics.

Graduate Admission to the University

The University of Idaho offers 31 doctoral programs, 5 specialist programs, and 87 master's programs. Graduate students are able to pursue degrees full- or part-time.

Graduate programs are offered through one or more of the following locations: Moscow, the UI's Centers in Boise, Coeur d'Alene, or Idaho Falls, as well as Engineering Outreach or other distance learning opportunities.

More than 600 faculty members participate in teaching and research. In addition to the accreditation of individual programs, the University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

Academic Requirements

Students who satisfy all criteria listed below will be considered for graduate admission to the University of Idaho:

(1) Have a bachelor's degree from a college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association. If the degree is from a recognized but not regionally accredited institution, the application will be reviewed by the department and by the College of Graduate Studies.

(2) Have an undergraduate cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 or higher or an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.00 or higher for the last 60 semester credits (or 90 quarter credits),

(3) Have maintained at least a 3.00 grade-point average in subsequent academic work if any, and

(4) Have been reviewed and recommended for acceptance by the academic unit administering the program in which the student seeks to enroll. For individual academic unit admission requirements, please refer to individual department sections of this catalog or consult the Graduate Admissions website at www.uidaho.edu/gradadmissions.

The College of Graduate Studies requires all applicants to submit three letters of recommendation, a one to two page Statement of Career Objectives and a one to two page resume/curriculum vitae.

Students planning to apply for work leading to a graduate degree should contact the academic unit in which they wish to major before submitting the application for graduate admission. All admission recommendations are made at the academic unitl level with final admission decision made by the College of Graduate Studies. Admission is granted only to a specific degree and program and initial admission is granted for a specific semester.

Admission application files will be sent to the academic unit for review once all required documents have been received by the Graduate Admissions Office and the application fee has been paid. Students currently enrolled in a college or university need to submit a current transcript that shows all work completed thus far.

Priority Deadlines and Application Fees

Domestic Applicants

International Applicants

Fall- February 1

Fall-February 1

Spring-September 1

Spring-September 1

Summer-February 1

Summer-February 1

Non-refundable application fee $60.00

Non-refundable application fee $60.00

Priority consideration for awarding College of Graduate Studies tuition waivers will be given to applicants who meet the above deadlines. Individual academic units may have earlier admission deadlines especially for applicants seeking financial assistance or assistantships.

Some academic units do not admit graduate students for the Spring and Summer terms.

Applications received after the above deadlines but before the official start of the semester for which the applicant is seeking entry will be accepted only if additional students can be accommodated.

Please consult the graduate admissions website at www.uidaho.edu/gradadmissions for more information regarding academic departments' requirements and deadlines.

The Graduate Admissions Office is not authorized to release application information to anyone other than the applicant without written authorization . Please submit a Student Consent for Release Form (available on the admissions website) if you want someone specific to be given information regarding your admission status.

Graduate Record Examination

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not a College of Graduate Studies requirement, but is required by some academic units. Official copies of GRE results must come from the Educational Testing Service. In rare cases, if the examination is many years out of date, students may be able to provide unofficial results of the examination with their admission application to facilitate evaluation and acceptance. GRE scores are retained by the student's academic unit.

Transcripts and Application for Graduate Admission

Students wishing to enter the College of Graduate Studies must submit a University of Idaho application for admission, three letters of recommendation from professional/academic references, a statement of career objectives, a vitae/resume, and have official transcripts sent directly from each institution attended to the Graduate Admissions Office. Transcripts become the property of the university and cannot be copied, returned, or forwarded.

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required for permanent residents and American citizens whose primary language is not English. Primary language is defined as native language or the official language used by the country of the applicants previous university level education.

Acceptance to the College of Graduate Studies

When admitted to the College of Graduate Studies, a graduate applicant will be issued a letter of acceptance. Acceptance is granted for a specified term. If an applicant does not register for the term desired or admitted but wishes to enroll in a future term, the applicant must submit a new application and fee to the Graduate Admissions Office. Application support materials (transcripts, letters of recommendation, resume/vitae, etc.) for applicants who are admitted but do not enroll, applications who are denied, or applicants who do not complete the admission process are retained for up to one year.

Graduate Admission Categories

Regular Enrollment. Regular enrollment for graduate study leading toward an advanced degree may be granted to a student who satisfies all of the following criteria: (1) has a bachelor's degree from a college or university accredited by a regionally accrediting association, (2) has an undergraduate cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 or higher or an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.00 or higher for the last 60 semester credits (or 90 quarter credits), (3) has maintained at least a 3.00 grade-point average in subsequent academic work if any, and (4) has been reviewed and recommended for acceptance by the department administering the program in which the student seeks to enroll.

Provisional Enrollment. A student who is not eligible for regular enrollment may be considered for provisional enrollment (on the master's level only) if the academic unit administering the program recommends it, and if at least two of the following conditions are met: (1) the student's undergraduate GPA shows steady improvement; (2) the student has taken post-baccalaureate undergraduate level course work with A and/or B grades; (3) the student has achieved the 75th percentile on the relevant GRE or equivalent exam; (4) the student has been out of school for five or more years and has been working for at least one year in the field of the proposed graduate major. The academic unit specifies conditions that the student must fulfill in order to be advanced to regular enrollment. Provisional enrollment may also be granted to a student who is otherwise eligible for regular enrollment but whose prospective academic unit specifies conditions that he or she must first meet (i.e. achievement of specific grades and/or completion of specific course work). International students who hold nonresident alien visas and students who are to be appointed to assistantships cannot be accepted in provisional enrollment.

The admissions office notifies the student that he/she has been accepted for provisional enrollment. In the letter of acceptance, the following general and specific terms governing the student's provisional enrollment are stated:

  1. A student may not remain in provisional enrollment status for more than 12 consecutive calendar months (a shorter period may be specified). Nor may a student remain in this status after completing nine credits (a lower credit limitation may be specified).
  2. A student will be advanced from provisional to regular enrollment provided he or she maintains a GPA of at least 3.00 each semester while in the provisional status (a higher GPA may be specified), fulfills the conditions, if any, that were specified at the time of initial enrollment, and receives no incompletes.
  3. A student who does not meet the stated conditions for advancement to regular enrollment within the specified time and credit limitations cannot continue in the College of Graduate Studies or enroll in 500-level courses and is subject to normal disqualification and reinstatement procedures.

It is the student's responsibility to be in touch with the administrative unit regarding his or her progress toward meeting the conditions for advancement.

The conditions specified for a student's advancement to regular enrollment are established at the time of his or her acceptance and must not be changed (i.e., either strengthened or relaxed) thereafter.

Academic units need not require a student to make up ALL of his or her academic deficiencies while in provisional enrollment. Performance on a limited selection of them should suffice to demonstrate whether or not the student has the ability to do satisfactory graduate work. Remaining deficiencies, if any, can be made up after the student is in regular enrollment. The academic unit must be sure that any courses the student is required to take while in provisional enrollment will, in fact, be offered during that period.

Unclassified Enrollment. Unclassified enrollment is for students who do not wish to work for a graduate degree and is not to be used as a probationary category. Admission as an unclassified student does not guarantee subsequent transfer to a degree program. This enrollment category is not open to international students who hold nonresident alien visas or to students who are to be appointed to assistantships. Students on Unclassified enrollment are not eligible for Title IV financial aid.

Non-degree Student. Refer to the "Non-Degree Admission Requirements" section above for a full description of this classification. Non-degree students are not admitted to the College of Graduate Studies. They may, however, take graduate courses with permission of the instructor and the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies provided that they have earned a baccalaureate degree with an overall 3.00 GPA. Non-degree students are not eligible for Title IV financial aid. If a non-degree student receives a grade of C, D, or F in a 500-level course, he/she loses the privilege of taking more 500-level courses.

Concurrent or Multiple Level Curricula for Graduate Students. A graduate student may simultaneously enroll in an undergraduate, graduate or law program. The "Course Level Adjustment" form indicating course use (graduate, undergraduate or law) is available and must be filed each semester or session byy the 10th day of classes. Please note that students seeking a degree at more than one level will need to officially apply for admission at the appropriate level. Placing courses from the undergraduate level to the graduate level or graduate level to the undergraduate level, when no degree is sought, does not require admission to the level where the course will be placed. Student fees for the courses are determined by the student's primary level; however, an undergraduate will be charged graduate fees for any courses placed on the graduate transcript.

Seniors in 500-Level Courses. A senior who has a cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 or higher may enroll in 500-level courses. The course(s) may be placed on either the undergraduate or the graduate transcript but will automatically be placed on the undergraduate transcript unless the student completes a "Course Level Adjustment" form indicating the appropriate transcript placement. for the course. The placing of courses on a graduate transcript does not admit or guarantee subsequent admission of such students to the Graduate College. The deadline for filing the "Course Level Adjustment" form is the tenth day of the class for that semester or session. All courses placed on a graduate transcript, regardless of the course level, will be assessed graduate fees.

Returning Students. A graduate student who has completed one degree and wishes to enroll in further courses must file a "Change of Curriculum" form with the Graduate Studies Office. A returning graduate student who has not enrolled within two years of the term in which he or she wishes to register must file an Application for Readmission with the Graduate Admissions Office (see B-1). Readmission must be approved by the department in whose degree program the returning graduate student wishes to enroll. If the department denies the readmission, the student will be moved automatically into Unclassified enrollment status.

Graduate Admission of International Students

The College of Graduate Studies welcomes applications from qualified students from other countries. International applicants are expected to have qualifications equivalent to those required of other graduate students.

Credentials. Official transcripts and/or certified copies of the certificate, diploma, or government examination report received on completion of any college or university course work must be sent by the certifying agency directly to the Graduate Admissions Office. The credentials must be translated into English if written in a foreign language.

English Language Proficiency. UI requires all applicants whose primary language is not English to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Because most applicants report the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score, UI bases its minimum English language proficiency requirements on the TOEFL. UI College of Graduate Studies requires a minimum TOEFL score of 550/79 (paper orinternet based test). Equivalent measures of proficiency acceptable to UI include the MELAB ( 77), the Cambridge IELTS (6..5).,. It is important to verify the departmental TOEFL score requirement as many departments require a score higher than indicated above. Exceptions to the minimum TOEFL requirement are made for (a) those from official English-speaking countries, (b) those who have earned a degree from either a U.S. institution, or (c) based on the judgment of the Graduate Admissions Office, those who have earned at least 12 credits, with a grade C or better, in university-level English courses from a U.S. institution. UI does not accept scores that are more than two years old.

Deferred Admission. Deferred admission may be granted to applicants who qualify academically, but who have not yet met UI's minimum English language proficiency requirement. In deferred admission status, students enroll in UI's American Language and Culture Program (ALCP) to achieve the academic units English language requirement prior to being granted full admission and commencing their degree programs. Please note that not all academic units grant deferred admission.

Concurrent Enrollment as an Option of Deferred Admission. Students enrolled in ALCP Level 5 or Level 6 may, in consultation with the coordinator of ALCP and the course instructor, obtain approval to enroll as non-degree students for up to 7 credits per semester of academic courses in addition to their full-time ALCP courses. Students whose proficiency levels later prove inadequate for success in the academic courses may be withdrawn at the discretion of the academic course instructor and the ALCP coordinator. Once students achieve the necessary language qualification and gain full admission to the university, they may apply the credits of academic courses completed while in deferred admission status toward UI degree programs (other university and College of Graduate Studies restrictions may apply).

Financial Statement. As required by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), all international students who hold or intend to hold nonresident alien visas must present to the Graduate Admissions Office satisfactory statements of finances and adequate proof of financial responsibility or sponsorship to cover all financial obligations while attending the University of Idaho.

Health and Accident Insurance. Supplemental health and accident insurance is mandatory for international students who hold nonresident alien visas and all accompanying dependents. Students must purchase and maintain the UI health insurance (SHIP) policy or document coverage of an equivalent policy with the International Programs Office before they are allowed to register or attend classes. Failure to obtain and maintain the required insurance may subject students to sanctions, up to and including disenrollment. See information on insurance in the Student Services section.

Status. In order to pursue a degree, international students must be authorized in their current visa status. Immigration regulations require that international students holding F-1 or J-1 student visas be certified as full-time students during the academic year. F-1 graduate students are required to be enrolled in 9 credit hours and are allowed to take up to 3 credits of on-line coursework towards this requirement. J-1 visa holders are also required to enroll in 9 credit hours, but are not allowed to take online classes toward the 9-credit requirement. Other visa categories may be eligible to study in the U.S. Students who do not hold an F-1 or J-1 student status should contact the International Programs Office for rules governing enrollment while in the U.S.

Deadline for Application for Admission. To provide time for evaluation, for notice of admission status to reach the applicant, and for USICE requirements to be met for issuance of a student visa, applications and credentials should be received by the Graduate Admissions Office no later than the following dates: for fall semester, May 1; for spring semester, October 1; for summer session, March 15. (Please note: The priority application deadlines are February 1 for fall semester and summer sessions and September 1 for spring semester. Priority consideration for awarding College of Graduate Studies tuition waivers will be given to applicants who meet those deadlines.)

International Student Advisors. The international student advisors (ISAs) are involved with an international student's progress at every stage of the educational process. Once a student has been admitted, the ISAs provide general information about cultural adjustment and the educational system, as well as specific details about other matters. Community contacts may be arranged, if requested. All matters pertaining to a student's non-immigrant status with Department of Homeland Security (DHS) are handled through the International Programs Office. A mandatory orientation before registration provides new students with assistance on initial questions. After this orientation, students are invited to visit the ISAs at any time with questions or concerns relating to immigration matters, education, finances, and cultural adjustment. The ISAs also serve as official liaisons between students and their consular offices or sponsoring agencies.